It Is Immoral to Allow Birth Control and Abortions

Contraception is a complicated, and recently controversial topic. The debate ranges from issues on topics like birth control, to abortion, and human rights. The Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) is at the frontline of the healthcare debate because it changes many areas of healthcare that people fundamentally believe in. this may be whether the cost of contraception is worth it, who is entitled to it, and whether or not it is religiously acceptable.

Various religious groups have historically been opposed the general pro-choice agenda because abortion is seen as morally unacceptable. The Catholic Church, for example, is opposed to abortion because “human life must be respected and protected absolutely from the moment of conception.” Catholics are expected to follow the norms established by their faith, and so they don’t use birth control. Abortion falls under birth control because it’s preventing a birth, and so for that reason, many Catholics oppose the pro-choice and pro-abortion agenda. On the other hand, Christians have mixed views about abortion. There is some text in the bible in Exodus that talks about imposing a fine on someone who strikes a woman and causes a miscarriage, which shows that it’s treated as a crime; however, there is no explicit statement in the bible that condemns abortions either. Since there are no religious guidelines about abortion Biblically, many Christians use their own morals to decide wether they support abortion or not.

Republicans alike have also historically opposed contraception. As you can see from the graph, there is a consistent majority of republicans identifying as pro-life supporters, and that majority grows larger as time goes.This shows

that if the trend continues, more and more republicans are going to lean towards a pro-life position on abortion and birth control. In 2012 senator Marco Rubio, a republican of Florida introduced a bill that would cut off birth control access to millions of women by allowing employers to drop coverage of contraceptive services if the employer cites religious reasons. The bill could also “allow states to refuse birth control through Medicaid, which provides family planning services to millions of women.” This bill didn’t make it through the senate. Sarah Palin, former governor of Alaska, takes a similar position. She is opposed to all forms of abortion in most cases, however she does support parental consent for female minors seeking an abortion. In 2010 she opposed the affordable care act, and after the bill passed she voted to defund it and also to repeal parts of the law. Ted Cruz, governor of Texas, is with his fellow republicans when it comes to defunding Obamacare. But for him it’s not a question of morals or religious beliefs. Cruz is opposed to the law because he does not believe the funding is being properly spent. On January 16, 2014, Ted Cruz asked to pass an amendment that would prohibit spending bills from funding Obamacare, and then also to defund Obamacare and to use the funds to restore cuts to military pensions. This attack on Obamacare clearly shows that republicans do not value the health of the public, and care more about military pensions.

There hadn’t been any legal restrictions on abortion in the US for a long time, up until about the 1800’s. Abortion was made illegal out of fear that the population of whites would be dwindled by arriving immigrants. this was before most forms of modern medicine, like anti-infection agents. More recently there have been advances in birth control rights due to emerging information and rising political will. “The supreme court decision in Roe vs. Wade made it possible for women to get safe, legal abortions from well-trained medical practitioners.” This access to legal abortion made it safer and resulted in less pregnancy-related injury or death. Similar results were recorded in a 2012 study from Washington University in St. Louis. The study tested how free access to contraception affected abortion rates. Results showed an 82% reduction in abortion rates, repeat abortions, and teenage birth rates. The study also concluded that “if no-cost contraception were made available to the entire population of the sample region, the researchers…nationally, they estimate it could prevent as many as  62% to 78% of abortions annually.” This is clear evidence that cost is a major factor that limits the use of contraceptives. when the cost was taken out of the equation, the results were less unintended pregnancies, which means less women seeking abortions.

From a religious view Catholics are the only ones who are actively opposed to abortion/ birth control. Other religions are either tolerant of it or do not give explicit guidelines. Republicans are, and will always be opposed to abortion. Some argue that it costs too much and that the funds should be spent elsewhere, and others say it conflicts with their moral/ religious beliefs. If there were fewer abortions needed due to national subsidized contraception, then that’s fewer abortions that the government has to pay for. Abortions aren’t cheap. The abortion pill costs between $300-$800, and an in-clinic procedure may range from $300-$950. Compared with the birth control pill, which costs about $15-$50 per month, the difference is clear: prevention is cheaper than treatment. If the public did not have to worry about the cost of contraception, they can plan more effectively and abortion rates would drop significantly. There really is no reason to prohibit or deny access to contraception because a healthy public makes for a healthy country.

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One Comment Add yours

  1. Junming says:

    Interesting facts. Actually, it is shocking to me that abortion is illegal in many states.

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